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What you need to know about the Autumn Statement 2014

Financial Planning, General, Investments, ISA, Pensions, Savings, Tax Planning
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What you need to know about the Autumn Statement 2014

On 3rd December 2014 George Osborne gave us his Annual Autumn Statement which for reasons best known to someone else is in December.  But that’s not important right now and if you’re like me it will be googled later.  Anyway here are some of the main points relevant to your personal financial planning broken down into relevant headings.

Income

The income tax personal allowance will rise to £10,600 in April 2014 which is £100 higher than expected. The higher rate tax threshold will also increase to £42,385 in April, again £100 more than expected.

Anyone in receipt of Universal Credit will find their benefits frozen for the coming year.

Savings

The ISA limit has been raised to £15,240 in April.  The chancellor has also said that with immediate effect when the saver dies their spouse will inherit the ISA and be able to maintain its tax free status.  This could be very interesting for future IHT planning.

Pensions

As expected the Chancellor announced that if you die prior to age 75 in receipt of a joint life annuity pension your dependents with receive the dependents income tax free.

This brings joint life annuities in line with flexi-access drawdown but there was no mention of final salary schemes dependents pensions so watch this space.

There were no changes to the tax relief through pensions either before or after age 75.

The single tier state pension is expected to start in April 2016 at £151.25 per week.

Property

As usual the Government wants a headline maker in the Autumn Statement and this year it’s stamp duty.  The stamp duty system has been revamped from a stepped to a tiered charging system as show below.

[table width =”100%” style =”table-striped table-bordered table-hover” responsive =”true”] [table_head] [th_column]Purchase price[/th_column] [th_column]Stamp Duty[/th_column] [/table_head] [table_body] [table_row] [row_column]First £125,000[/row_column] [row_column]0%[/row_column] [/table_row] [table_row] [row_column]£125,001-£250,000[/row_column] [row_column]2%[/row_column] [/table_row] [table_row] [row_column]£250,001-£925,000[/row_column] [row_column]5%[/row_column] [/table_row] [table_row] [row_column]£925,001-£1.5m[/row_column] [row_column]10%[/row_column] [/table_row] [table_row] [row_column]£1.5m+[/row_column] [row_column]12%[/row_column] [/table_row] [/table_body] [/table]

For example if you buy a property for £275,000 you will pay a total of £3,750 in stamp duty which equates to 1.36%. Under the old regime you would have paid £8,250 at 3% on the whole lot.

About Ciaran Scullion

I am a Financial Planner and Mortgage Adviser. I provide Independent Financial Advice through my company From Acorns Financial Planning Ltd to personal and business clients throughout Northern Ireland from my base in Tyrone, Mid Ulster.

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